August 4, 2020

“We are overreacting because if it looks like you’re overreacting, you’re probably doing the right thing”

“We are overreacting because if it looks like you’re overreacting, you’re probably doing the right thing.” That’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci on Sunday, March 15th. He is, of course, speaking about the health crisis, but I think there is an investment and business corollary to this that is important to mention. The US stock market has just comp...

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Commercial vs Household Bankruptcies in May 2020

One way in which the current recession looks nothing like the last one is that businesses have been a lot more affected financially than households. This is due to the extraordinary stimulus and rescue packages that came out of the government to a) keep people employed b) offer increased unemployment benefits c) announce forbearance initiatives to stop foreclosures and put rent payments on ice and d) make direct deposits ...

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Massive Up and Down Moves in Stocks in the Same Year Are More Common Than You Think

There have been two massive moves in the stock market this year. After a relatively calm start to the year, it took just 23 trading sessions for the S&P 500 to fall 34%. It’s now up 40% since the lows seen on March 23, 2020. It’s hard to fathom such massive moves occurring during the same year (and this year is still not even halfway over). Once you start digging into the historical numbers you begin to re...

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Troy Prince introduces Wall Street to talent they haven’t discovered yet

Josh here – a few months back, Troy Prince came by the office to chat informally about the not-for-profit he’s been building, Wall Street Bound. As someone who had spent years as a trader for some of the largest firms in the world, Troy understood better than most how difficult it is for people from where he grew up to gain entrance to this world. Troy is now on a mission to change that and open up the entran...

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Animal Spirits: The Unluckiest Generation

We discuss: 2020 vs. 1968 Putting your problems into perspective Who is to blame for wealth inequality in America? Why young people are so angry right now Why working from home is a privilege Why did the savings rate increase to 33%? Why you can’t gauge the economy based on a single datapoint Why don’t more companies cut pay instead of firing people? Why is so much money pouring into airline stocks? Carl Icah...

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10 Great Dividend Stocks With 50+ Years of Consecutive Increases

Commitment is a word often thrown around, but rarely backed up with actions. Salesmen are committed to your needs until you sign on the dotted line - then they are committed to next unsigned contract. A true measure of character is how committed are you to doing right when the times are hard and you are tempted to go astray? This same test can be applied to companies that pay and increase their

To continue reading, please click on the article title above...

10 Great Dividend Stocks With 50+ Years of Consecutive Increases

Commitment is a word often thrown around, but rarely backed up with actions. Salesmen are committed to your needs until you sign on the dotted line - then they are committed to next unsigned contract. A true measure of character is how committed are you to doing right when the times are hard and you are tempted to go astray? This same test can be applied to companies that pay and increase their

To continue reading, please click on the article title above...

Why We Don’t Learn From History

1968 is widely regarded as one of the worst years in American history. It was the deadliest year in the Vietnam conflict with more than sixteen thousand American soldiers dying. In a nine-week span between April and June of 1968 both Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy, two of the most inspirational figures in the country, were assassinated. Racial tensions led to riots and student protests against the war across t...

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